Safer Structures Campaign launches to call on Government to raise cable standards

The Safer Structures Campaign, a new body led by Tratos, has launched to urge the Government to raise the safety standards of cables in homes and buildings across the country.

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Cable standards raised during Westminster Hall debate - 01.11.17

During a Westminster Hall debate on product safety and fire risk in residential premises, MP for Knowsley George Howarth raised Safer Structure’s policy calls around the enforcement of Construction Products Regulation (CPR).

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Millions of metres of dangerous cable 'in homes across UK'

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By Gareth Furby and Ed Davey 
BBC News

Millions of metres of dangerous electrical cable may be in homes across the UK, a BBC investigation has found.

In 2010 it was discovered Atlas Kablo, a now-defunct Turkish company, had sold 11 million metres of cable that posed a potential fire risk in the UK.

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Campaign to Raise the Bar for Fire Safety in UK : The Healthy Homes Project

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Sign the Petition: Put pressure on BSi to upgrade wiring regulations

After any catastrophic and potentially avoidable event, the Powers That Be talk about the thorough investigation and learning lessons.

Eventually, for those not personally affected, anger turns to sorrow as time advances and inquiries proceed. My view? Lessons learned aren’t enough. Regulation has to step up; standards have to demand more than minimum.

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Home safety can learn from Volvo's 3-point seatbelt

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THE LIFE-SAVING THREE-POINT SEAT BELT WAS TOO SIGNIFICANT NOT TO SHARE, ACCORDING TO VOLVO.

Nils Bohlin, an engineer at Volvo, invented the three-point seat belt in 1959. The 1950s were a time when pilots and racing drivers wore harnesses, but seatbelts – where they were fitted in cars – took the form of a rudimentary two-point waist restraint. In crashes, sometimes these did more harm than good.

The reason the three-point seatbelt is so widely adopted is actually that Volvo opened up the patent so that any car manufacturer could use it in their design. They decided that the invention was so significant, it had more value as a free life-saving tool than something to profit from.

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